High Weald

plan_typesFarmsteads are a vital feature of the High Weald landscape.  This report details how farmsteads have been mapped and categorised in support of wider guidance on their reuse.  Understanding farmsteads so we can manage and adapt these vital buildings to the future challenges facing them is the main driver of this research.

Report title:
Historic Farmsteads & Landscape Character in The High Weald AONB

pdf Historic farmsteads and landscape character in the High Weald (10.57 MB)

Status and date:
Complete, 2008

Research purpose:
Understanding; the landscape context of farmsteads, their form, history and plan type are significant indicators for how we can manage and adapt these vital buildings to the future challenges facing them.  The research will help us meet Objective S2 of the High Weald AONB pdf Management Plan (17.24 MB) .

Research aim(s):

  • To gain an understanding of the character and survival of historic farmsteads across the High Weald.

Research findings:
This report presents the results of a project that has recorded all farmsteads and outfarms or field barns in the High Weald AONB shown on the 2nd Edition Ordnance Survey map of c.1895. Most previous surveys of farmsteads have concentrated on individual buildings. This project however, has taken the plan form of the farmstead; the way the buildings are arranged and associated with the farmhouse, tracks and yards, as the key attribute with which to describe the overall character of a farmstead.

AONB Unit comment:
Understanding the way in which farmsteads developed and were used will help us to guide their re-use and development in the future - in a way that respects their character.

Managing sustainable development in rural areas is a challenge faced by all policy makers in the High Weald.  It is hoped this research and subsequent guidance will provide useful evidence and information to support planning decisions.

Commission by:
The High Weald Joint Advisory Committee (JAC) and English Heritage

Commissioned from:
Forum Heritage Services

Funded by:
The High Weald Joint Advisory Committee (JAC) and English Heritage